Treatment options of Ulcerative colitis

MEDICINES

Medicines that may be used to decrease the number of attacks include:

  • 5-aminosalicylates such as mesalamine or sulfazine, which can help control moderate symptoms. Some forms of the drug are taken by mouth; others must be inserted into the rectum.
  • Medicines to quiet the immune system.
  • Corticosteroids such as prednisone. They may be taken by mouth during a flare-up or inserted into the rectum.
  • Biologic therapy, if you do not respond to other drugs.
  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol) may help relieve mild pain. Avoid drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn). These can make your symptoms worse.

SURGERY

Surgery to remove the colon will cure ulcerative colitis and removes the threat of colon cancer. You may need surgery if you have:

  • Colitis that does not respond to complete medical therapy
  • Changes in the lining of the colon that can lead to cancer
  • Severe problems, such as rupture of the colon, severe bleeding, or toxic megacolon

Most of the time, the entire colon, including the rectum, is removed. After surgery, you may have:

  • An opening in your belly called the stoma (ileostomy). Stool will drain out through this opening.
  • A procedure that connects the small intestine to the anus to gain more normal bowel function.

Source and full text: U.S. National Library of Medicine MedlinePlus http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000250.htm

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